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Ask the Expert

Turn your pupils into budding young reporters!

This short interview-style activity will give pupils the opportunity to meet and interview one of the Trust’s expert bird staff and talk about their profession.

Pupils will ask questions to find out how they became involved with birds, what training and qualifications they have, as well as the favourite aspects of their job and the most interesting thing about it.

The member of staff being interviewed will bring along his or her favourite bird too and pupils will find out about the training of this bird as well as a bit about its personality, temperament, likes and dislikes. They’ll learn about the species and discover new words that describe the different parts of the anatomy and physical features of a bird of prey.

Teachers are encouraged to spend some time with pupils before the visit to prepare some questions and explore what it is they would like to find out during the interview.

This session has been developed to provide pupils with a unique opportunity to write a report about what they have learned from an expert in an unusual field. This supports the continuing development of confidence of individual conversation and listening skills. Pupils will be encouraged to take notes during the interview so they can recall what they have learnt back at school.

Subject areas:

English (speaking and listening)

Subject links to:

Science, Media

Adaptable for:

Key Stage 2 – Key Stage 4 (can be adapted for Key Stage 1 as a show and tell style activity)

Objectives:

Curriculum links:

Running time:

20-30 minutes

Links to outreach visit topics:

History of Falconry, Vultures and Conservation

Enquire today

If you are interested in finding out more or booking one of our on-site school workshops, please get in touch using the below form.

Please tell us which workshop you are interested in:
Owl Pellet InvestigationConservation in ActionNational Bird of Prey HospitalPredator Adaptations and Food WebsHabitat SurveysAsk the ExpertArt WorkshopLife through DanceLife in WordsSarson Falconer DisplayI'm not sure yet

Did you know?
Vultures feed their chicks by eating and then regurgitating food from their crop to their chicks.
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