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How to get here

Our address is Hawk Conservancy Trust, Visitor Centre, Weyhill, Andover, Hampshire, SP11 8DY

Temporary Road Closures - A303

Highways England are planning some weekend closures on the A303 for road and bridge works that may affect your journey time to the Hawk Conservancy Trust.

Diversions will be in place and signage to the Hawk Conservancy Trust will be installed.  The diversions are expected to slightly lengthen your journey time, so please allow an additional 20-30 minutes.

The closures are planned for the following dates, however are subject to change, so look out for signage;

Thruxton Hill/Kimpton Quarley

Friday 15 to Monday 18 September – A303 EASTBOUND carriageway closed  between the A338 and the A343 junctions

Friday 22 to Monday 25 September – A303 WESTBOUND carriageway closed between the A343 and the A338 junctions

Picket Twenty

Friday 3 to Monday 6 November – A303 EASTBOUND carriageway closed between the A343 and the A3093  junctions

Friday 1 to Monday 4 December – A303 WESTBOUND carriageway closed between the A3093 and the A343 junctions

You can view the diversions on the following sites (7 days prior to the closures)

http://roads.highways.gov.uk/regions/south-east/?postcode=&keywords=&roads=A303&status=

http://www.trafficengland.com/

https://roadworks.org

Highways England have asked us to pass on their apologies for any inconvenience or disruption caused.

Arriving by car

We are situated four miles west of Andover, Hampshire, just off the A303 and 20 minutes from Stonehenge. From the A303, follow the brown tourist signs.

We offer ample free parking and have designated disabled parking close to the entrance of the park.

Arriving by public transport

Between Sunday 30 April and Sunday 17 September 2017 a public bus will run on Sundays and bank holidays from Andover’s bus and train stations and calls at the Trust as well as other local attractions. This service is run by Three Rivers Community Rail Partnership and operated by Stagecoach.

Download timetable
Did you know?
Owls are often associated with Hallowe’en because in the Middle Ages they were often thought to be witches. It was also believed that if you heard an owl’s call, it meant someone was going to die.
©2017 Hawk Conservancy Trust